Public Service Loan Forgiveness | American Student Assistance

Advocacy

Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Advocacy

Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) was created to encourage borrowers to enter into public service work or the nonprofit sector by forgiving their eligible federal student loan balance. With confusion swirling about the availability and terms of promised PSLF for millions of student loan borrowers, American Student Assistance’s Center for Consumer Advocacy has launched a national awareness campaign, 10 Years To Zero Debt, to educate borrowers about PSLF and boost enrollment in the program.

Here you will learn more about eligibility requirements, including eligible loans, payments, employers, and how to apply. As a nonprofit with 60+ years’ experience advocating for students and borrowers, American Student Assistance® (ASA) is providing this information free of charge. All eligible borrowers are encouraged to download the form from our site and apply for PSLF directly with the U.S. Department of Education by using the address in Section 7 of the form.

Student Loan Borrowers

If you have questions about PSLF, send us an email. If you have other student loan questions or have loans held by American Student Assistance, email us here.

Employers

If you are a qualified eligible employer, download the resources below to promote the PSLF program to your employees.

Eligible Employer Toolkit

Borrowers Denied PSLF To Get Second Chance Under New Legislation

The federal fiscal 2018 omnibus spending bill contains a new $350 million fund that will help borrowers who have been denied Public Service Loan Forgiveness get a second chance at having the balance of their federal student loans forgiven this year. Borrowers who have recently applied for PSLF, but were rejected because they made “non-qualifying” payments under a Graduated or Extended payment plan, rather than one of the Income-Driven Repayment plans, may now become PSLF-eligible under the provisions of the new bill. But there are some limitations–read more.

Next: Eligibility